London’s Best Sustainable Fashion Brands

Credit: theresident.co.uk

Ethical and sustainable fashion is taking the industry by storm, with everyone from big-name designers to small independent labels focusing on becoming more sustainable. The Resident seeks out London fashion labels that are doing all they can to minimise their environmental impact so that you can dress to impress with a clear conscience

Feather & Chain
Jewellery can complete your look, hold sentimental value or reflect your mood. But do you ever think about where it comes from? Feather & Chain, a London-based jewellery brand, was inspired by time spent in Bali to create delicate boho-inspired pieces. Constantly evolving to ensure their jewellery matches their values, their latest Terra collection uses recycled sterling silver with hopes to do the same with their gold by the end of 2021. To minimise waste, any unsold pieces can be sent back to be recycled and, used again in their next designs. Plus, £1 from every sale goes towards The Elephant Crisis Fund.
featherandchain.com

Dai
Created for women, by women, London-based fashion brand Dai is all about empowering women through the clothes they wear. Founder Joanna Dai combined her experience of growing up in California with the New York spirit and London’s classic tailoring to create a timeless look for the modern working woman. Dai is also taking a 360-approach in sustainability: 88% of their textiles are eco-certified, meaning they are tested to be chemically safe on your skin; they offset 100% of carbon emissions; and their Eco-Luxe Essentials collection is made from trees from certified sustainably managed forests. Perfect for investing in your working wardrobe.
daiwear.com

Baukjen
Celebrating slow fashion, Baukjen, focuses on creating timeless pieces that can be worn year in, year out. The brand makes some of our current favourite wardrobe staples, including the Marte Organic Hoodie, which is perfect for working from home. Made from super soft organic cotton, you can cosy up and feel confident knowing that it’s ethically made from natural fibres. The brand is also certified BCorp, meaning they’ve been awarded for meeting the highest standard of social and environmental performance.
baukjen.com

Fanfare
Contemporary clothing meets social justice at Fanfare, a local label that handcrafts everything in the UK, using London factories and local artisans. Fanfare is using their talent and working with human trafficking charities to eradicate slavery from fashion supply chains, as well as working with homeless charities empowering women and teaching skills to get them into work. Opting for seasonless collections, their latest launch combines bold and stylish designs with repurposed and reused materials to create a wardrobe of sustainable clothing made to last. Specialising in one-off pieces, we love their White Floral Petal Embroidered Jeans, made from upcycled denim.
fanfarelabel.com

Slo Active
For those planning for summer, Slo Active, a luxury Oceanwear brand should be on your list of places to hit. Not only do they design stunning swimwear that looks as good whether you’re lying on the beach to paddle boarding and everything in between. Every time one of their beautifully crafted pieces are purchased, they donate to one of their ocean partner charities of your choice. They also plant one mangrove tree for every piece made with SeaTrees.
sloactive.com

Sans Matin
Trainers are set to be one of the biggest trends in 2021, and Sans Matin have designed classic yet stylish sneakers that would suit anybody’s wardrobe. They are using locally sourced materials to minimise material waste and reduce their carbon footprint. Since December 2020, all Sans Matin shoes are made with a custom-designed, 60 per cent natural rubber soles. The rubber is produced by sustainably tapping rubber trees, and a new tree is planted to keep a continuous sustainable production.
sansmatin.co.uk

Beulah
Beulah founders Natasha Rufus Isaacs and Lavinia Brennan set up their luxury womenswear and accessories label brand to support women affected by human trafficking and the sex trade. The duo volunteered at an aftercare home in Delhi, where they spoke to women about what they had been through. As a result, they decided to set up a fashion-based project – as embroidery was something the women could do – to create simple, easy-to-wear dresses with a classic feel. With demand growing, they joined forces with Freeset, a large organisation in Kolkata supporting those who have been trafficked or working in the sex trade, teaching them the skills they need to earn a wage. Plus, The Beulah Trust reinvests 10% of all accessory sales and proceeds from special events back into charity projects.
beulahlondon.com

Scroll Up